Radical Open Innovation News week 45-2019

Welcome to our biweekly selection of digital innovation news. Created using our opinionated automated selection algorithm with a twisted text rank summary creator. We present some top innovation news items to get you thinking, debating and take action in order to make our world even better.

1 The State of the Octoverse

Software development is, more than ever, a community endeavor. The Octoverse is growing more interconnected as it becomes easier to find and build on work from others around the globe. The world’s code is created by an increasingly global community. In fact, most GitHub users (nearly 80%) come from outside of the United States.

(Github)

2 How Secure Is Your Face?

Biometric security, which spans everything from iris scans to fingerprint sensors, is undergoing the same kind of race against hackers as every other type of sensor. Besides BioStar 2’s biometric data, the research firm was able to access information including usernames, passwords, user identification information, employee records including home addresses, emails. Anyone can take a picture of your face, your iris, or your fingerprints and gain access to your bank accounts.” But the question that needs to be asked each time is whether someone hacked it, or whether there is a comfort level that it is secure. Biometric security is moving into the mainstream at a rapid pace.

(Semiconductor Engineering)

3 Bringing autonomous systems to engineers: Taking a leap from the digital world of games to the real world

So, operating physical systems like machines or chemical processes for millions of cycles to generate data to train AI can be a very expensive proposition. Simulations are a safe and cost-efficient way to train AI models, if you can model the key elements like the devices, the sensors and the environment interacting with your system. AI can’t learn from its failures as easily in the real world, where the potential cost of mistakes can be huge. Pac- Man has the ability to fundamentally change the way we will build control systems in the future. Today we live in the age of data-driven artificial intelligence (AI), where machine intelligence systems solve difficult problems by considering hundreds of millions of trials or training episodes.

(Microsoft)

4 Leading Remotely

Allowing people to work remotely means that you are not limited to the talent that’s near you geographically. Digital tools make working from home possible and contribute greatly to the flexibility of both organizations and individuals. Add these other types of workers, hired on a temporary, part-time, or contract basis as critical contributors to many business teams, and the number of remote employees balloons. While digital tools facilitate remote project management and collaboration, they can also make it harder to tell what each person is actually contributing. Relying solely on updates via digital tools can lead to under- or over- appreciation in the best- case scenario and misattribution and resentment in the worst.

(MIT Sloan Management Review)

5 Should Businesses Stop Flying to Fight Climate Change?

In a recent exchange in the climate Twittersphere (yes, that’s a thing), Genevieve Guenther, founder and director of EndClimateSilence.org, tweeted that climate movement leaders have to stop flying. The climate movement is not going to be effective until its leaders stop flying. People working on climate change — and really all of us in business trying to make change happen — have to win hearts and minds. From Prince Harry to soccer star David Beckham to CEOs planning to attend Davos, people are being asked a tough question: Should we all stop flying? We face enormous, complicated challenges like climate change, water and resource shortages, and inequality. But on climate change in particular, we have a lot of work to do.

(MIT Sloan Management Review)

The Radical Open Innovation weekly overview is a brief overview of innovation news on Digital Innovation and Management Innovation from all over the world. Your input for our next edition is welcome! Send it to [info] at [bm-support]dot[org]